StarQuest USA

Open to all Starion and Conquest enthusiasts.
 
HomeRegisterLog in

Share | 
 

 Mitsubishi Tricks and Tips

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
AuthorMessage
UlrichWolf
Moderation
Moderation
avatar

Posts : 49
Join date : 2010-12-02
Age : 42
Location : Kansas

PostSubject: Mitsubishi Tricks and Tips   2010-12-04, 5:43 pm

This is a gathering of a lot of different folks, so I will separate by name....

UlrichWolf
Quote :
Clean all of your fusible links, and grounds at least once a year. So many electrical gremlins are exorcised by this alone. Make sure to not forget the ground at the ECU.

Always use a Mitsubishi exhaust gasket, the slice-your-ass three layer metal job. While we're talking exhaust, replace the nuts every time you have to take it off. Those copper nuts are actually one time use.

When changing the framerail fuel filter, it's much easier to remove the fuel lines at the injection mixer, and at the junction just at the firewall, and pull the filter and hoses as an assembly. Just pay attention to how it goes when you reassemble it.

For '88-'89 model cars, restore the gloss to your A/C control panel by cleaning with NON-CHLORINATED brake cleaner.

I have found that changing thermostats every 3rd or 4th oil change is a wise move. Seems like they become compromised fairly quick.

Use only dealership PCV Valves, and oil filters.

Burton:
Quote :
My SQ tips- I'll start in the front and work my way back....


When removing the front bumper from the car, remove the grille and header panel. Then undo the airdam to fender bolts. Once those are off, there are only 4 main bolts to worry about to get the bumper off. 3 of them are easy to get at but one, not so much. Luckily the bad one to get is the rear passenger side bolt, and both rear bolts only have to be loosened. The front two bolts need to be removed all the way and then the whole asembly will slide out. The rear passenger side bolt is kinda hard to get at with all the IC pipes going thru that area, but if you have a swivel and/or knucle socket extension, its a piece of cake- especially since you just have to loosen it a few turns. For those just looking to swap out an airdam, its best to follow this too as the airdam is easier to remove when the bumper is off the car.



The outside door handles were a pain for me to remove the first time I did it- even broke one of them. The problem was that I could get the nuts off, but couldn't get the handle rod clip undone so I couldn't get the rod out. I have since heard of somone else who had the same problem when they went to sell the handles out of a parts car- they couldn't get them unhooked either so they took a set of air shears to get them out and ruined a perfectly good door. Anyway, after fussing and fighting with it I realized there is an access hole just for this purpose. Its an oblong looking hole/slot thing in the inner door frame pretty much right behind the key cylinder- this hole is often covered with silvery metal foil tape. Once you find that hole you get a fairly large flated screwdriver and you will have the proper angle to use the tip of the screwdriver to pop off the clip. Once the clip is off you can use the same screwdriver to kinda pry the rod where it hooks to the handle to pop it off. The location of the access hole gives you the perfect leverage.


If you have to remove the majority of the rear axles/suspension/diff., its way quicker to drop the whole assembly, but be advised that it is not easier to put in that way. You'll have to plan on putting it together one piece at a time.


Rear bumper- This one's pretty easy, but I've heard some people get stuck. There are two bolts in the trunk pan going down into it- one on each side- those are the easy ones. There are also two that screw up from the bottom, but those are also like the rear bolts of the front bumper in that they only have to be loosened.

Maxzillian:
Quote :
*When removing the rear struts, I found that the strut is just a tick too long for it to slide all the way out from the rear hub carrier when the suspension is resting on it's own.

A simple piece of wood or a prybar wedged under the hub between it and the suspension arm with you foot on top of it does wonders for gaining that last inch of movement you need. biggrin.gif

*When installing cylinder heads, put the intake and exhaust manifolds on first. They're a royal pain to install once the head is in the car. Rolling Eyes

*If you do install an intake manifold after the head has been bolted to the block, remove the a/c pump and you'll gain a lot more room to reach those lower studs. (Helps if your system wasn't charged like mine was)

*When installing an engine, remove one bolt from the passenger's side engine mount and rotate it up. Then drop the engine in, stab the driver's side mount and secure it loosely with the nut. Then rotate the passenger's side mount into place to stab it.

*On manual transmission cars without an engine, a piece of baling wire can be used to hang the bellhousing from the line clip attached to the firewall that holds the a/c, abs, and other various lines in place. Now the car can be rolled around without a jack holding the transmission up.

Shelby:
Quote :
#1 undo battery cable

DJPowerhaus:
Quote :
label all electric plugs that you unplug.. both male and female sides.

Indy85StarionES:
Quote :
Replace timing and balance shaft chains and guides -- ASAP.

Jainsworth:
Quote :
When pulling the timing cover, draw a diagram on a piece of cardboard and stick the bolts in it accordingly when removing.

I use zip-lock sandwich bags, a marker and post-its. As I a pull a part off, I label the post-it and put all the bolts for that part in a bag and zip it shut.

Both of these come in handy when you go to put stuff back together.

Stock the refrigerator with beer before hand..don't hit it heavy til the job is done :wink:

When you finish using a tool, put it back where it belongs, don't just lay it "somewhere".

MainstreaM:
Quote :
CLEAN YOUR TOOLS

Clean tools are happy tools,
and
Happy tools work better.
Back to top Go down
Dz Nutz
Administration
Administration
avatar

Posts : 294
Join date : 2010-11-24
Age : 42
Location : Sycamore, OK

PostSubject: Re: Mitsubishi Tricks and Tips   2010-12-04, 7:24 pm

A lot of good newbie information there too. I have linked it to the noob section as well.


Last edited by Dz Nutz on 2010-12-04, 7:27 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : felt like it.)
Back to top Go down
http://starquestusa.forumotion.com
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: Mitsubishi Tricks and Tips   2010-12-08, 10:07 pm

@UlrichWolf wrote:
This is a gathering of a lot of different folks, so I will separate by name....

UlrichWolf
Quote :
Clean all of your fusible links, and grounds at least once a year. So many electrical gremlins are exorcised by this alone. Make sure to not forget the ground at the ECU.

Always use a Mitsubishi exhaust gasket, the slice-your-ass three layer metal job. While we're talking exhaust, replace the nuts every time you have to take it off. Those copper nuts are actually one time use.

When changing the framerail fuel filter, it's much easier to remove the fuel lines at the injection mixer, and at the junction just at the firewall, and pull the filter and hoses as an assembly. Just pay attention to how it goes when you reassemble it.

For '88-'89 model cars, restore the gloss to your A/C control panel by cleaning with NON-CHLORINATED brake cleaner.

I have found that changing thermostats every 3rd or 4th oil change is a wise move. Seems like they become compromised fairly quick.

Use only dealership PCV Valves, and oil filters.

Burton:
Quote :
My SQ tips- I'll start in the front and work my way back....


When removing the front bumper from the car, remove the grille and header panel. Then undo the airdam to fender bolts. Once those are off, there are only 4 main bolts to worry about to get the bumper off. 3 of them are easy to get at but one, not so much. Luckily the bad one to get is the rear passenger side bolt, and both rear bolts only have to be loosened. The front two bolts need to be removed all the way and then the whole asembly will slide out. The rear passenger side bolt is kinda hard to get at with all the IC pipes going thru that area, but if you have a swivel and/or knucle socket extension, its a piece of cake- especially since you just have to loosen it a few turns. For those just looking to swap out an airdam, its best to follow this too as the airdam is easier to remove when the bumper is off the car.



The outside door handles were a pain for me to remove the first time I did it- even broke one of them. The problem was that I could get the nuts off, but couldn't get the handle rod clip undone so I couldn't get the rod out. I have since heard of somone else who had the same problem when they went to sell the handles out of a parts car- they couldn't get them unhooked either so they took a set of air shears to get them out and ruined a perfectly good door. Anyway, after fussing and fighting with it I realized there is an access hole just for this purpose. Its an oblong looking hole/slot thing in the inner door frame pretty much right behind the key cylinder- this hole is often covered with silvery metal foil tape. Once you find that hole you get a fairly large flated screwdriver and you will have the proper angle to use the tip of the screwdriver to pop off the clip. Once the clip is off you can use the same screwdriver to kinda pry the rod where it hooks to the handle to pop it off. The location of the access hole gives you the perfect leverage.


If you have to remove the majority of the rear axles/suspension/diff., its way quicker to drop the whole assembly, but be advised that it is not easier to put in that way. You'll have to plan on putting it together one piece at a time.


Rear bumper- This one's pretty easy, but I've heard some people get stuck. There are two bolts in the trunk pan going down into it- one on each side- those are the easy ones. There are also two that screw up from the bottom, but those are also like the rear bolts of the front bumper in that they only have to be loosened.

Maxzillian:
Quote :
*When removing the rear struts, I found that the strut is just a tick too long for it to slide all the way out from the rear hub carrier when the suspension is resting on it's own.

A simple piece of wood or a prybar wedged under the hub between it and the suspension arm with you foot on top of it does wonders for gaining that last inch of movement you need. biggrin.gif

*When installing cylinder heads, put the intake and exhaust manifolds on first. They're a royal pain to install once the head is in the car. Rolling Eyes

*If you do install an intake manifold after the head has been bolted to the block, remove the a/c pump and you'll gain a lot more room to reach those lower studs. (Helps if your system wasn't charged like mine was)

*When installing an engine, remove one bolt from the passenger's side engine mount and rotate it up. Then drop the engine in, stab the driver's side mount and secure it loosely with the nut. Then rotate the passenger's side mount into place to stab it.

*On manual transmission cars without an engine, a piece of baling wire can be used to hang the bellhousing from the line clip attached to the firewall that holds the a/c, abs, and other various lines in place. Now the car can be rolled around without a jack holding the transmission up.

Shelby:
Quote :
#1 undo battery cable

DJPowerhaus:
Quote :
label all electric plugs that you unplug.. both male and female sides.

Indy85StarionES:
Quote :
Replace timing and balance shaft chains and guides -- ASAP.

Jainsworth:
Quote :
When pulling the timing cover, draw a diagram on a piece of cardboard and stick the bolts in it accordingly when removing.

I use zip-lock sandwich bags, a marker and post-its. As I a pull a part off, I label the post-it and put all the bolts for that part in a bag and zip it shut.

Both of these come in handy when you go to put stuff back together.

Stock the refrigerator with beer before hand..don't hit it heavy til the job is done :wink:

When you finish using a tool, put it back where it belongs, don't just lay it "somewhere".

MainstreaM:
Quote :
CLEAN YOUR TOOLS

Clean tools are happy tools,
and
Happy tools work better.
Or with Fresh Brake Fluid
Back to top Go down
Dz Nutz
Administration
Administration
avatar

Posts : 294
Join date : 2010-11-24
Age : 42
Location : Sycamore, OK

PostSubject: Re: Mitsubishi Tricks and Tips   2010-12-09, 8:29 am

Brake fluid works great. So does ATF actually. Brake fluid is good for removing overspray from stuff too and it is neutralized with water.
Back to top Go down
http://starquestusa.forumotion.com
UlrichWolf
Moderation
Moderation
avatar

Posts : 49
Join date : 2010-12-02
Age : 42
Location : Kansas

PostSubject: Re: Mitsubishi Tricks and Tips   2010-12-09, 5:56 pm

CJ, I have always used the brake cleaner, but made certain it was non chlorinated. The chlorinated variety will eat anything in sight, skin included.

It work fairly nicely, you spray a rag, and wipe, and it just needs to be barely damp. No fuss, and definately, no muss.

Tim
Back to top Go down
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Mitsubishi Tricks and Tips   

Back to top Go down
 
Mitsubishi Tricks and Tips
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 1
 Similar topics
-
» Mitsubishi L200 Warrior
» Tips and Tricks from mud-and-guts
» Boston marathon tips
» Spinning tips and tricks...
» Tips, Tricks and Handy hints

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
StarQuest USA :: Tech Area :: FAQ, Write Ups, and Tech Answers-
Jump to: